PREGNANCY NUTRITION

Children  grow  up  too  fast.  Before  too  long  the  almost  indistinguishable  speck  in  your womb  is  going  to  be  flying  down  a  hill  on  a  bike  with  their  hands  in  the  air  and  driving  down  the interstate  in  your  new  car.  Before  you  know  it  you’ll  be  telling  them  good-bye  as  they  start college,  crossing  your  fingers  and  hoping  for  the  best.  You’ll  never  have  the  opportunity  to nurture  them  again  that  you  do  right  now,  when  they’re  safely  inside  you  tucked  away  from  the outside  world. This  is  going  to  be  the  last  time  in  your  life  that  it’s  a  piece  of  cake  to  get  them  to  eat their  vegetables,  so  enjoy  it!  You’re  going  to  spend  the  next  eighteen  years  (and  then  some) trying  to  convince  them  that  spinach  is  good  for  them  and  that  the  slimy  stuff  on  the  outside  of their  carrots  is  just  pulp,  but  right  now  you’re  making  all  the  decisions  when  it  comes  to  what they  eat. Proper  pregnancy  nutrition  is  a  vital  factor  in  proper  fetal  development  because  the  fetus is  physically  incapable  of  providing  for  itself,  nor  can  it  show  any  visible  signs  of malnourishment  between  monthly  check-ups  as  a  newborn  can.  That  means  that  for  the  next  nine months  it’s  going  to  be  completely  up  to  you  to  ensure  that  you  are  properly  eating  for  two, taking  in  the  vitamins  and  nutrients  that  are  going  to  help  you  give  birth  to  a  healthy,  happy  baby while  keeping  yourself  healthy  at  the  same  time. Remember,  baby’s  going  to  take  what  it  needs  long  before  those  nutrients  ever  have  the opportunity  to  go  through  your  system.    By  not  eating  properly  you’re  not  only  harming  your baby,  you’re  harming  yourself  as  well.  That’s  why  it’s  so  important  that  you  make  sure  you  get the  vitamins  and  nutrients  that  you  need  for  the  next  nine  months  as  well.  Lack  of  attention  might still  lead  to  a  healthy  baby,  but  baby’s  not  going  to  change  themselves!  Mom  needs  to  be  healthy too  in  order  to  keep  up  with  her  little  bundle  of  joy  in  the  coming  months.  Giving birth is  hard enough  on  the  body.  You  certainly  don’t  want  to  add  malnutrition  into  the  mix. The  problem  that  many  women  face  when  it  comes  to  pregnancy  nutrition  is  that  they simply  don’t  understand.  Why?  Not  because  they’re  stupid,  or  because  they  don’t  want  to  do what’s  best  for  their  baby.  It’s  because  most  books  on  pregnancy,  particularly  those  that  deal with  the  ins  and  outs  of  nutrition  for  the  next  nine  months,  are  written  by  medical  professionals. That makes sense, right?  Who  better  to  take  advice  from  concerning  the  growth  and  development of  your  baby  than  the  doctor  that’s  made  it  their  life’s  work? Most  moms  aren’t  doctors,  however,  and  that’s  where  the  trouble  comes  in.  It’s  all  well and  good  to  sit  down  and  look  at  a  chart  that  shows  how  much  of  each  mineral  you’re  supposed to  take  in  on  a  daily  basis  over  the  next  nine  months,  but  if  you  don’t  understand  what  you’re reading  and  the  effect  it’s  going  to  have  on  your  baby  then  it  isn’t  going  to  do  you  a  whole  lot  of good.  You’re  going  to  spend  a  month,  maybe  two,  looking  at  the  labels  on  the  back  of  your  food. Then  you’re  going  to  get  sick  of  it  and  go  back  to  your  old  eating  habits,  reasoning  that  you’ve always  been  healthy.  You’re taking your prenatal vitamins.  What could go  wrongFrom  A to Zinc If  you  have  ever  attempted  to  go  on  any  kind  of  diet  that  involved  reading  the  information on  the  nutritional  labels  of  your  food  you  are  all  too  familiar  with  the  fact  that  those  little  words and  symbols  can  start  to  look  like  Greek  after  a  while.  If  you‟re  not  a  doctor  or  a  nutritionist  you probably  have  no  idea  of  what  Vitamin  B  or  Folic  Acid  are,  much  less  why  they‟re  important. The  first  step  to  conquering  pregnancy  nutrition  is  understanding  what  you’re  eating,  how  much you  should  eat,  why  you’re  eating  it  and  how  it’s  going  to  help  your  baby. A quick  note.  In  the  following  section  you  are  going  to  see  several  mentions  made  about the  negative  consequences  of  overdosing  on  specific  vitamins.  You  must  understand  that  this overdose  very  rarely  occurs  because  of  the  foods  you  eat.  More  often  it  is  because  mothers  have chosen  to  consume  extra  supplements  in  an  attempt  to  “help”  their  baby  or  they  have  forgotten  to tell  their  physician  about  other  vitamins  and  supplements  they  take  on  a  regular  basis.  Be  sure when  you  go  in  for  your  prenatal  appointments  that  your  physician  knows  exactly  what  vitamins, medications  and  supplements  (including  herbal)  you  take,  regardless  of  how  insignificant  you may  believe  them  to  be.

 1.  Vitamin  A:  Vitamin  A  helps  the  development  of  baby‟s  bones  and  teeth,  as  well  as their  heart,  ears,  eyes  and  immune  system  (the  body  system  that  fights  infection). Vitamin  A  deficiency  has  been  associated  with  vision  problems,  which  is  why  your mom always  told  you  to  eat  your  carrots  when  you  were  a  kid!  Getting  enough Vitamin  A  during  pregnancy  will  also  help  your  body  repair  the  damage  caused  by childbirth.   Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  770  micrograms  (or  2565  IU,  as  it  is  labeled on  nutritional  labels)  of  Vitamin  A  per  day,  and  that  number  almost  doubles  when nursing  to  1300  micrograms  (4,330  IU).  Be  aware,  however,  that  overdosing  on Vitamin  A  can  cause  birth  defects  and  liver  toxicity.  Your  maximum  intake  should  be 3000  mcg  (10,000  IU)  per  day.   Vitamin  A  can  be  found  in  liver,  carrots,  sweet  potatoes,  kale  spinach  collard  greens, cantaloupe,  eggs,  mangos  and  peas.

 2.  Vitamin  B6:  Also  known  as  Pyridoxine,  Vitamin  B6  helps  your  baby‟s  brain  and nervous  system  develop.  It  also  helps  Mom  and  baby  develop  new  red  blood  cells. Oddly  enough,  B6  has  been  known  to  help  alleviate  morning  sickness  in  some pregnant  women. Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  1.9  mg  per  day  of  Vitamin  B6.  That  amount rises  slightly  when  nursing  to  2.0  mg  per  day. Vitamin  B6  can  be  found  in  fortified  cereals,  as  well  as  bananas,  baked  potatoes, watermelon,  chick  peas  and  chicken  breast.

 3.  Vitamin  B12:  Vitamin  B12  works  hand  in  hand  with  folic  acid  to  help  both  Mom  and baby  produce  healthy  red  blood  cells,  and  it  helps  develop  the  fetal  brain  and  nervous system.  The  body  stores  years‟  worth  of  B12  away,  so  unless  you  are  a  vegan  or suffer  from  pernicious  anemia  the  likelihood  of  a  B12  deficiency  is  very  slim. Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  2.6  mcg  (104  IU)  of  B12per  day,  nursing mothers  2.8  mcg  (112  IU). Vitamin  B12  can  be  found  in  red  meat,  poultry,  fish,  shellfish,  eggs  and  dairy  foods. If  you  are  a  vegan  you  will  be  able  to  find  B12  fortified  tofu  and  soymilk.  Other  foods are  fortified  at  the  manufacturer‟s  discretion.

 4.  Vitamin  C:  Vitamin  C  helps  the  body  to  absorb  iron  and  build  a  healthy  immune system  in  both  mother  and  baby.  It  also  holds  the  cells  together,  helping  the  body  to build  tissue.  Since  the  Daily  Recommended  Allowance  of  Vitamin  C  is  so  easy  to consume  by  eating  the  right  foods  supplementation  is  rarely  needed. Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  80-85  mg  of  Vitamin  C  per  day,  nursing mothers  no  less  than  120  mg  per  day. Vitamin  C  can  be  found  in  citrus  fruits,  raspberries,  bell  peppers,  green  beans, strawberries,  papaya,  potatoes,  broccoli  and  tomatoes,  as  well  as  in  many  cough  drops and  other  supplements.

 5.  Calcium:  Calcium  builds  your  baby‟s  bones  and  helps  its  brain  and  heart  to  function. Calcium  intake  increases  dramatically  during  pregnancy.  Women  with  calcium deficiency  at  any  point  in  their  lives  are  more  likely  to  suffer  from  conditions  such  as osteoporosis  which  directly  affect  the  bones.   Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  1200  mg  of  calcium  a  day,  nursing  mothers 1000  mg  per  day. Calcium  can  be  found  in  dairy  products,  such  as  milk,  cheese,  yogurt  and,  to  a  lesser extent,  ice  cream,  as  well  as  fortified  juices,  butters  and  cereals,  spinach,  broccoli, okra,  sweet  potatoes,  lentils,  tofu,  Chinese  cabbage,  kale  and  broccoli.  It  is  also widely  available  in  supplement  form.

 6.  Vitamin  D:  Vitamin  D  helps  the  body  absorb  calcium,  leading  to  healthy  bones  for both  mother  and  baby.   Women  who  are  pregnant  or  nursing  should  consume  at  least  2000  IU  of  Vitamin  D per  day.  Since  babies  need  more  Vitamin  D  than  adults  babies  that  are  only breastfeeding  may  need  a  Vitamin  D  supplement,  so  if  your  doctor  recommends  this don‟t  worry.  You  haven‟t  done  anything  wrong!  Formula  is  fortified  with  Vitamin  D, so  if  you  are  bottle  feeding  or  supplementing  with  formula  your  baby  is  probably getting  sufficient  amounts  of  this  vital  nutrient. Vitamin  D  is  rarely  found  in  sufficient  amounts  in  ordinary  foods.  It  can,  however,  be found  in  milk  (most  milk  is  fortified)  as  well  as  fortified  cereals,  eggs  and  fatty  fish like  salmon,  catfish  and  mackerel.  Vitamin  D  is  also  found  in  sunshine,  so  women and  children  found  to  have  a  mild  Vitamin  D  deficiency  may  be  told  to  spend  more time  in  the  sun.

 7.  Vitamin  E:  Vitamin  E  helps  baby‟s  body  to  form  and  use  its  muscles  and  red  blood cells.  Lack  of  Vitamin  E  during  pregnancy  has  been  associated  with  pre-eclampsia  (a condition  causing  excessively  high  blood  pressure  and  fluid  retention)  and  low  birth weight.  On  the  other  hand,  Vitamin  E  overdose  has  been  tentatively  associated  with stillbirth  in  mothers  who  “self  medicated”  with  supplements. Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  20  mg  of  Vitamin  E  per  day  but  not  more than  540  mg. Vitamin  E  can  be  found  in  naturally  in  vegetable  oil,  wheat  germ,  nuts,  spinach  and fortified  cereals  as  well  as  in  supplemental  form.  Natural  Vitamin  E  is  better  for  your baby  than  synthetic,  so  be  sure  to  eat  lots  of  Vitamin  E  rich  foods  before  you  reach for  your  bottle  of  supplements.

 8.  Folic  Acid:  Also  known  as  Folate  or  Vitamin  B9,  Folic  Acid  is  a  vital  part  of  your baby‟s  development.  The  body  uses  Folic  Acid  for  the  replication  of  DNA,  cell growth  and  tissue  formation.  A  Folic  Acid  deficiency  during  pregnancy  can  lead  to neural  tube  defects  such  as  spina  bifida  (a  condition  in  which  the  spinal  cord  does  not form  completely),  anencephaly  (underdevelopment  of  the  brain)  and  encephalocele  (a condition  in  which  brain  tissue  protrudes  out  to  the  skin  from  an  abnormal  opening  in the  skull).  All  of  these  conditions  occur  during  the  first  28  days  of  fetal  development, usually  before  Mom  even  knows  she‟s  pregnant,  which  is  why  it‟s  important  for women  who  may  become  or  are trying  to  become  pregnant  to  consistently  get  enough Folic  Acid  in  their  diet. Pregnant  woman  should  consume  at  least  0.6-0.8  mg  of  Folic  Acid  per  day. Folic  Acid  can  be  found  in  oranges,  orange  juice,  strawberries,  leafy  vegetables, spinach,  beets,  broccoli,  cauliflower,  peas,  pasta,  beans,  nuts  and  sunflower  seeds,  as well  as  in  supplements  and  fortified  cereals.

 9.  Iron:  Iron  helps  your  body  to  form  the  extra  blood  that  it‟s  going  to  need  to  keep  you and  baby  healthy,  as  well  as  helping  to  form  the  placenta  and  develop  the  baby‟s cells.  Women  are  rarely  able  to  consume  enough  iron  during  their  pregnancy  through eating  alone,  so  iron  supplements  along  with  prenatal  vitamins  are  often  prescribed. Women  who are  pregnant  should  have  at  least  27  mg  of  iron  per  day,  although  the Center  for  Disease  Control  suggests  that  all  women  take  a  supplement  containing  at least  30  mg.  The  extra  iron  rarely  causes  side  effects;  however,  overdosing  on  iron supplements  can  be  very  harmful  for  both  you  and  your  baby  by  causing  iron  build-up in  the  cells.   Iron  can  be  found  in  red  meat  and  poultry,  which  are  your  best  choice,  as  well  as legumes,  vegetables,  some  grains  and  fortified  cereals.

10.  Niacin:  Also  known  as  Vitamin  B3,  Niacin  is  responsible  for  providing  energy  for your  baby  to  develop  as  well  as  building  the  placenta.  It  also  helps  keep  Mom‟s digestive  system  operating  normally. Pregnant  women  should  have  an  intake  of  at  least  18  mg  of  Niacin  per  day. Niacin  can  be  found  in  foods  that  are  high  in  protein,  such  as  eggs,  meats,  fish  and peanuts,  as  well  as  whole  grains,  bread  products,  fortified  cereals  and  milk.

 11.    Protein:  Protein  is  the  building  block  of  the  body‟s  cells,  and  as  such  it  is  very important  to  the  growth  and  development  of  every  part  of  your  baby‟s  body  during pregnancy.  This  is  especially  important  in  the  second  and  third  trimester,  when  both Mom and baby are  growing  the  fastest. Pregnant  and  nursing  women  should  consume  at  least  70g  of  protein  per  day,  which  is about  25g  more  than  the  average  women  needs  before  pregnancy. Protein  can  be  found  naturally  in  beans,  poultry,  red  meats,  fish,  shellfish,  eggs,  milk, cheese,  tofu  and  yogurt.  It  is  also  available  in  supplements,  fortified  cereals  and protein  bars.

 12.  Riboflavin:  Also  known  as  Vitamin  B2,  Riboflavin  helps  the  body  produce  the  energy it  needs  to  develop  your  baby‟s  bones,  muscles  and  nervous  system.  Women  with Riboflavin  deficiency  may  be  at  risk  for  preeclamsia,  and  when  baby  is  delivered  it will  be  prone  to  anemia,  digestive  problems,  poor  growth  and  a  suppressed  immune system,  making  it  more  vulnerable  to  infection. Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  1.4  mg  of  Riboflavin  per  day,  nursing mothers  1.6  mg. Riboflavin  can  be  found  in  whole  grains,  dairy  products,  red  meat,  pork  and  poultry, fish,  fortified  cereals  and  eggs.   

 13.  Thiamin:  Also  known  as  Vitamin  B1,  thiamin  helps  develop  your  baby‟s  organs  and central  nervous  system.   Pregnant  women  and  nursing  mothers  should  consume  at  least  1.4  mg  of  Thiamin  a day.  Nursing  mothers  who  are  Thiamin  deficient  are  at  risk  for  having  babies  with beriberi,  a  disease  which  may  affect  the  baby‟s  cardiovascular  system  (lungs  and heart)  or  the  nervous  system. Thiamin  can  be  found  in  whole  grain  foods,  pork,  fortified  cereals,  wheat  germ  and eggs.

 14.  Zinc:  Zinc  is  vital  for  the  growth  of  your  fetus  because  it  aids  in  cell  division,  the primary  process  in  the  growth  of  baby‟s  tiny  tissues  and  organs.  It  also  helps  Mom and  baby  to  produce  insulin  and  other  enzymes. Pregnant  women  should  have  an  intake  of  at  least  11-12  mg  of  Zinc  per  day. Zinc  can  be  found  naturally  in  red  meats,  poultry,  beans,  nuts,  grains,  oysters  and dairy  products,  as  well  as  fortified  cereals  and  supplements.

STOP

 Bear  in  mind  that  the  Recommended  Daily  Allowances  are  just  that-recommended.  None of  those  number  has  been  formulated  on  a  case-by-case  basis,  so  if  your  doctor  recommends something  else  for  you  listen  to  what  they  have  to  say.  After  all,  they  managed  to  run  up  that student  loan  somehow! Calories Now that  you‟re  familiar  with  the  various  vitamins  and  minerals  that  you  are  going  to need  to  have  during  pregnancy  let‟s  touch  on  another  topic  that  is  near  and  dear  to  the  female heart-calories.  In  light  of  society‟s  avid  love  affair  with  scrawny  women,  women  who  are  less than  thin  have  developed  a  major  complex  when  it  comes  to  calories.  They  count  them,  they  burn them,  they  measure  them,  and  they  factor  them.  They  avoid  them  whenever  possible  and  are enthusiastic  consumers  of  anything  that  has  the  words  “low”  and  “calorie”  printed  on  them.  In short,  women  have  made  battling  against  calories  their  lifelong  mission,  dedicating  themselves  to it  with  a  fervency  that  would  equal  any  religious  zealot  in  the  world.   Caloric  Intake  During  Pregnancy The  first  thing  you  must  understand  is  that  pregnancy  is  not  the  time  to  be  counting calories.  If  you  are  on  a  diet  that  involves  severely  restricting  your  caloric  intake  get  off  it.  Right now.  For  the  next  nine  months  you  have  permission  to  not  suffer  for  beauty.  Not  only  is restricting  calories  not  going  to  result  in  weight  loss  (you‟re  going  to  gain  some  as  the  baby grows  whether  you  like  it  or  not)  it  could  potentially  harm  your  baby.   Not  getting  enough  calories  during  pregnancy  can  lead  to  the  baby  not  having  what  it needs  to  develop  properly.  Low  birth  weight  is  a  common  complication,  as  is  poor  fetal development.  The  baby  may  have  any  number  of  deficiency-associated  birth  defects.  In  short,  it is  vitally  important  that  when  you  are  pregnant  you  get  enough  to  eat.  You  can  burn  it  all  off after  the  baby  is  born,  although  to  be  honest  if  you  have  time  to  worry  about  your  weight  you will  be  handling  new  motherhood  much  better  than  most! The  first  thing  you  want  to  do  is  calculate  your  pre-pregnancy  Recommended  Daily Caloric  Intake.  If  you  are  a  health  buff  or  have  been  living  on  a  terminal  diet  you  may  already know  this  number.  If  you  do  not  you  can  visit  one  of  the  following  sites  to  figure  it  out,  or consult  with  your  physician.   http://www.globalrph.com/dieting_calc.htm   http://www.yeraze.com/scripts/calories.php   http://pregnancychildbirth.suite101.com/article.cfm/eating_for_two (this  site  will  also provide  practical  advice  about  estimating  caloric  intake  for  the  rest  of  your pregnancy,  although  it  doesn‟t  take  into  account  weight  gain  or  loss.) For  the  first  three  months  of  your  pregnancy  you  actually  do  not  need  to  consume  any extra  calories.  Your  pre-pregnancy  calorie  consumption  will  be  perfectly  adequate  for  your baby‟s  growth  and  development  as  long  as  you  are  not  dieting.  If  you  are  dieting,  stop!  This  is the  number  of  calories  (roughly)  that  you  want  to  eat  in  a  day. As  you  go  into  your  second  and  third  trimester  you  should  increase  your  daily  caloric intake  by  300  calories.  This  will  help  to  compensate  for  the  increasing  rate  of  your  baby‟s growth.  If  your  pre-pregnancy  caloric  intake  was  1800  calories  you  should  consume  2100   calories  a  day.  If  it  was  1400  calories  you  should  consume  1700  calories,  and  so  on  and  so  forth. Again,  this  is  not  the  time  to  try  and  lose  weight.  Do  not  omit  these  extra  calories  in  favor  of allowing  your  body  to  burn  them  instead.  This  is  not  healthy  for  you  or  your  baby,  and  if  you  are breastfeeding  you  will  quickly  work  these  calories  back  off.   The  number  of  calories  you  need  during  pregnancy  is  going  to  vary  if  you  were  not  a  healthy weight  when  you  became  pregnant.  Women  who  were  obese  may  be  told  to  consume  fewer calories  to  prevent  excessive  weight  gain,  which  would  place  extra  strain  on  the  heart  and  lungs and  increase  the  likelihood  of  blood  pressure  related  problems  during  pregnancy.  In  this  case  this is  a  fine  time  to  diet,  as  long  as  you  are  following  your  doctor‟s  advice.  The  healthier  you  are,  the healthier  your  baby  is  going  to  be. On the  flip  side  of  that  coin,  if  you  were  underweight  at  the  beginning  of  your  pregnancy  or have  not  gained  what  the  doctor  considers  to  be  an  adequate  amount  of  weight  since  becoming pregnant  you  may  be  told  to  increase  your  caloric  intake  by  more  than  300.    The  baby  needs  to be  able  to  take  enough  calories  away  from  your  body  to  grow,  and  if  you  don‟t  have  any  to  spare either  because  you  aren‟t  eating  enough  or  your  body  is  burning  everything  that  you  eat  they  are going  to  suffer. www.weightlossnook.com

Caloric  Intake  While  Nursing Nursing  mothers  generally  need  500  calories  more  a  day  than  their  pre-pregnancy Recommended  Daily  Allowance.  This  takes  into  consideration  the  fact  that  the  average breastfeeding  infant  consumes  650  calories  a  day,  which  is  why  breastfeeding  mothers  generally lose  weight  much  more  quickly  than  their  bottle  feeding  counterparts.  The  weight  you  gained while  pregnant  will  make  up  the  difference.  That‟s  an  instant  weight  loss  of  150  calories  per  day just  by  doing  what  comes  naturally!  (For  reference  sake,  that‟s  roughly  the  equivalent  of  fifteen minutes  of  running  or  stair  climbing.) Those  nursing  twins  or  who  had  little  weight  gain  during  pregnancy  may  to  eat  more calories  in  a  day  because  their  bodies  will  not  have  enough  extra  weight  to  compensate.  Again, your  baby  is  getting  the  calories  it  needs  from  your  body.  If  you  do  not  have  enough  calories  to spare  to  create  an  adequate  amount  of  breast  milk  your  baby  will  go  hungry,  forcing  you  to  either up  your  caloric  intake  or  begin  to  supplement.   Healthy  Calories  Vs.  Unhealthy  Calories It  is  important  to  note  at  this  time  that  no  two  calories  are  created  equal.  There  are  300 calories  in  a  protein  bar  and  a  banana  smoothie,  and  there  are  300  calories  in  the  average  piece  of cheesecake.  Guess  which  one  is  going  to  be  better  for  your  baby? The  difficult  part  of  counting  calories  when  you‟re  pregnant  is  that  you  need  to  maintain a  careful  balance  on  several  levels.  First  and  foremost,  you  want  to  make  sure  that  you‟re  eating enough  to  give  your  baby  what  it  needs.  Secondly,  you  want  to  make  sure  that  the  calories  you are  eating  are  “good”  calories,  calories  coming  from  foods  that  are  going  to  provide  your  baby with  nutritional  benefit  as  well.   On the  flip  side,  you  do  not  want  to  consume  too  many  calories.  If  you  do  you  will  gain too  much  weight,  potentially  putting  you  at  risk  for  early  labor,  pre-eclamsia,  diabetes  and  heart problems.  You  also  do  not  want  to  restrict  your  food  intake  too  much.  Pregnancy  can  lead  to some  pretty  intense  cravings,  and  ignoring  these  cravings  can  lead  women  to  do  some  crazy things.   Unless  you  have  one  of  the  weight  problems  mentioned  above  you  are  probably  better  off considering  your  calorie  intake  guidelines  to  be  just  that-guidelines.  It‟s  not  going  to  hurt  you  to go  over  every  once  in  a  while  and  indulge  in  a  piece  of  cheesecake  or  a  chocolate  chip  cookie. Just  don‟t  do  it  too  often  or  too  excessively.  (Binging  and  eating  a  half  a  gallon  of  chocolate  ice cream  once  isn‟t  going  to  hurt  you,  although  it  might  make  you  sick,  but  doing  it  every  day  could be  a  problem.) Try  not  to  count  your  “junky”  calories  as  part  of  your  daily  necessary  intake.  This  will help  you  to  continue  eating  the  required  number  of  “good”  calories  in  a  day,  making  sure  that your  baby  is  getting  the  nutrition  that  it  needs.  (That  half  gallon  of  ice  cream  is  going  to  account for  about  half  of  your  daily  caloric  intake,  which  means  that  half  of  the  calories  that  your  baby needs  to  grow  today  just  went  down  the  drain.)  It  is  also  going  to  help  keep  you  from  doing  it  too often,  since  consistently  eating  five  to  six  hundred  calories  over  your  recommended  daily  intake is  going  to  lead  to  excessive  weight  gain.  The  first  time  you  step  on  the  doctor‟s  scale  and  see you‟ve  gained  ten  pounds  in  a  month  the  urge  to  binge  flies  out  the  window! Junk  food  aside,  not  all  “good”  calories  are  created  equal  either.  Here  are  some  basic guidelines  for  choosing  calories  that  are  going  to  meet  your  caloric  needs,  your  nutritional  needs and  your  basic  food  desires.  You  have  doubtlessly  at  some  point  in  your  life  gone  on  a  diet  that has  required  you  to  limit  yourself  to  certain  types  of  foods.  The  Adkins  diet,  for  example, severely  limits  your  carbohydrates,  while  the  Sonoma  Diet  cuts  your  dairy  in  half.  What happened  when  you  gave  this  diet  a  try?  Unless  you  are  extremely  creative  (or  have  an  incredible amount  of  self  control)  you  probably  stuck  to  this  diet  for  a  short  while,  then  tossed  it  to  the wayside. The  trick  to  eating  healthy  when  you  are  pregnant  is  the  same  as  eating  healthy  when you‟re  not.  You  have  to  recognize  what  foods  are  best  for  your  body  and  attempt  to  focus  on them  rather  than  their  more  tempting  and  less  healthy  counterparts.  When  you  are  choosing  the foods  you  will  eat  when  you  are  pregnant,  consider  the  following:   Is it  whole?  Whole  foods are  those  that  are  as  close  to  their  natural  form  as  possible rather  than  being  processed.  Fresh  fruits  and  vegetables  rather  than  canned,  whole grain  breads  rather  than  refined  white  and  real  cheese  fall  into  this  category.  Whole foods  are  especially  good  for  pregnant  women  because  the  fiber  and  water  contained in  them  makes  them  easier  to  digest.  This  not  only  helps  keep  you  from  being  even more  tired  than  you  already  are  because  your  body  is  struggling  to  digest  your  food, it  also  helps  you  to  decrease  your  chances  of  suffering  from  constipation.     Is it a  fruit  or  a  vegetable?  Fruits  and  veggies,  particularly  when  fresh  and/or  leafy and  green,  are  a  valuable  component  of  any  pregnancy  diet  because  most  necessary vitamins  can  be  found  in  them.  Look  below  for  a  quick  recap  of  necessary  vitamins and  the  foods  that  provide  them.   Is it a  good  carbohydrate  or  a  bad  carbohydrate?  You  cannot  eliminate  carbohydrates from  your  diet  entirely  when  you  are  pregnant.  They  provide  both  you  and  your  baby with  the  energy  that  you  both  need  to  grow  and  be  healthy.  What  you  can  do  is  make sure  that  the  carbohydrates  you  eat  are  good  for  you.  There  are  two  primary  classes of  carbohydrate,  simple  and  complex.  Simple  carbohydrates  are  made  of  small  sugar molecules  that  your  body  quickly  absorbs.  Examples  of  this  are  cakes,  white  breads, cookies,  candies  and  pastas.  These  are  the  carbohydrates  that  you  want  to  avoid because  they  will  give  you  a  quick  sugar  rush  then  leave  you  feeling  tired  and cranky-like  the  little  toes  digging  into  your  ribs  all  night  long  weren‟t  enough  to  do that! The  second  type  of  carbohydrate  is  a  complex  carbohydrate.  Complex  carbohydrates include  fiber  and  starches,  such  as  whole  grains  and  potatoes.  These  carbohydrates take  a  little  longer  to  digest,  leaving  you  feeling  fuller,  longer  and  giving  you  energy that  lasts  more  than  an  hour  or  two.  Of  course,  even  among  the  good  carbohydrates there  are  some  that  are  going  to  be  better  for  you  than  others.  If  you  are  having trouble  eating  due  to  morning  sickness  and  suffering  from  exhaustion  due  to hormonal  swings  this  is  important  to  know! In  order  to  get  the  most  punch  from  the  foods  you  eat  you  should  focus  on  eating those  that  provide  you  with  more  energy,  longer.  That  way  when  you  can‟t  eat  as much  as  you  did  your  baby  isn‟t  going  to  suffer.  Sweet  potatoes  and  real  whole  grain and  whole  wheat  products  are  your  best  choices,  as  well  as  fruits  such  as  grapes  and bananas.  Bear  in  mind  that  just  because  a  package  says  “whole  wheat”,  “whole grain”  or  “multigrain”  that  doesn‟t  necessarily  mean  that  it  is. Yes,  this  is  false  advertising  (sort  of)  but  it‟s  important  to  know.  A  food  is  only required  to  have  a  very  small  amount  of  whole  grain  in  order  to  claim  the  title legitimately.  It‟s  not  that  there  aren‟t  whole  grains  in  it,  it‟s  that  it‟s  not  all  whole grain.  There  are  usually  plenty  of  processed  and  refined  ingredients  included  as  well.   Are you eating  the  right  kinds  of  protein?  Like  carbohydrates  there  are  good  proteins and  there  are  so-so  proteins.  When  you‟re  looking  for  proteins  that  will  give  you  the most  bang  for  your  buck  you  should  focus  on  lean  meats,  eggs,  beef  and  beans.  The less  processed  it  is,  the  better  it  is  for  you.  Does  that  mean  you  can‟t  eat  those chicken  nuggets?  Certainly  not.  After  all,  when  the  sweet  and  sour  sauce  calls…It does  mean  that  you  shouldn‟t  allow  processed  meats  to  become  the  dominant  protein source  in  your  diet.   Is it  organic?  Organic  foods  are  usually  more  expensive  but  are  more  healthy  than their  counterparts.  Organic  foods,  as  defined  by  the  Healthy  Children  Project,  are those  that  are  grown  without  “pesticides  or  synthetic  (or  sewage-based)  fertilizers  for plant  materials  and  hormones  and  antibiotics  for  animals,  does  not  allow  genetic engineering  or  the  use  of  radiation,  and  emphasizes  the  utilization  of  renewable resources  as  well  as  the  conservation  of  land  and  water.” If  your  budget  won‟t  stretch  to  include  an  all-organic  diet  (unfortunately,  some  of those  products  came  with  a  pretty  hefty  shipping  fee)  attempt  to  focus  on  the  foods listed  by  the  government  as  the  best  to  be  bought  organically.  These  foods  are  those most  likely  to  be  contaminated  or  high  in  pesticides  and  include  apples,  bell  peppers, celery,  cherries,  grapes,  nectarines,  peaches,  pears,  potatoes,  raspberries,  spinach  and strawberries.   If  you  are  concerned  about  the  foods  you  are  eating  (and  not  buying  organically) peas,  pineapples,  papayas,  onions,  mangos,  kiwi,  sweet  corn,  cauliflower,  broccoli, bananas, avocados and asparagus have been judged the least likely to be contaminated or contain high amounts of pesticides.    What kind of fat is it? Your body needs certain types of fat, but trans fats (partially hydrogenated vegetable oil on the ingredients list) is difficult for your body to deal with and provides you with no nutritional value. Saturated fats are less healthy than unsaturated, are found in animal products such as butter and are best enjoyed in limited quantities. Recap-Necessary Vitamins and Their Sources  Vitamin Food Source   Vitamin A Liver, carrots, sweet potatoes, kale, spinach, collard greens, cantaloupe, eggs, mangos and peas Vitamin B6 Fortified cereals, bananas, baked potatoes, watermelon, chick peas and chicken breast Vitamin B12 Red meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs and dairy foods Vitamin C Citrus fruits, raspberries, bell peppers, green beans, strawberries, papaya, potatoes, broccoli and tomatoes Calcium Dairy products, fortified juices, fortified butters and fortified cereals, spinach, broccoli, okra, sweet potatoes, lentils, tofu, Chinese cabbage, kale and broccoli. Vitamin D Milk, fortified cereals, eggs and fatty fish (salmon, catfish and mackerel) Vitamin E Vegetable oil, wheat germ, nuts, spinach and fortified cereal Folic Acid Oranges, orange juice, strawberries, leafy vegetables, spinach, beets, broccoli, cauliflower, peas, pasta, beans, nuts and sunflower seeds Iron Red  meat and poultry, legumes, vegetables, some grains and fortified cereals Niacin (Vitamin B3) Eggs, meats, fish, peanuts, whole grains, bread products, fortified cereals and milk Protein Beans, poultry, red meat, fish, shellfish, eggs, milk, cheese, tofu, yogurt, fortified cereal and protein bars Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) Whole grains, dairy products, red meat, pork, poultry, fish, fortified cereals and eggs Thiamin  (Vitamin  B1) Zinc Whole  grains,  pork,  fortified  cereals,  wheat germ  and  eggs Red meats,  poultry,  beans,  nuts,  grains,  oysters, dairy  products  and  fortified  cereals How  Much  is Too  Much? Now that  you  know  what  you  should  be  eating,  how  do  you  go  about  figuring  out  how much  you  should  be  eating?  The  gold  standard  would  be  to  walk  around  reading  little  nutrition labels  and  keeping  a  small,  ongoing  food  journal  in  your  pocket  so  that  you  can  keep  track  of how  much  of  each  nutrient  you‟ve  taken  in  on  a  daily  basis-but  let‟s  wake  up  and  live  in  reality. No  one  has  that  much  time  on  their  hands.  Because  you  can‟t  always  keep  track  of  exactly  where you‟re  at  with  your  daily  requirements  you‟re  going  to  have  to  learn  to  make  some  sweeping generalizations. The  easiest  way  to  do  precisely  that  is  to  estimate  how  much  of  each  food  group  you  are going  to  need  on  a  daily  basis,  then  pick  foods  from  each  group  that  you‟re  particularly  fond  of and  that  provide  you  with  a  wide  variety  of  nutrients.  An  example  of  a  food  group  chart  is  shown below: Carbohydrates   Fruits-3  servings  daily   Vegetables-4  servings  daily   Whole grain  foods-9  servings  daily Meat   Poultry,  fish,  meat  or  legumes-3  servings  daily   Milk,  yogurt  or  cheese-3  to  4  servings  daily Does  that  sound  like  more  than  you  could  eat  in  a  week,  much  less  a  day?  Don‟t  worry.  A serving  in  this  context  isn‟t  the  half  a  plate  that  your  mother  used  to  give  you.  A  ham  sandwich made  with  whole  grain  bread  will  give  you  two  servings  of  whole  grains  and  one  serving  of meat.  Add  an  apple  to  that  and  you‟ve  just  had  one  of  your  fruit  servings  as  well.  A  typical serving  of  meat  is  considered  to  be  four  to  six  ounces,  about  the  size  of  a  chicken  breast  that  you would  find  in  a  formal  dining  establishment.  An  eight  ounce  glass  of  milk  will  give  you  a  serving of  dairy.   A day‟s  menu  to  meet  all  of  your  nutritional  requirements  might  look  something  like  this: Breakfast

2  cups  of  fortified  cereal  with  milk  (protein,  dairy  and  whole  grains) Banana Glass  of  orange  juice Snack Whole  wheat  English  muffin Apple Glass  of  milk Lunch Ham sandwich  made  with  whole  grain  bread 6  oz  baby  carrots Glass  of  milk Snack Glass  of  tomato  juice Whole  grain  bagel  with  organic  cream  cheese Broccoli  florets  dipped  in  Ranch  dressing Supper Trout  fillet  with  lemon Baked  potato 6  oz  peas Whole  grain  roll Glass  of  milk Snack Hot  chocolate 2  slices  of  whole  wheat  toast  with  calcium  fortified  butter

Mommy’s No-No List Just  as  there  are  certain  foods  that  you  should  be  sure  to  stock  up  on,  so  too  are  there foods  that  you  should  avoid  as  though  they  would  give  you  the  plague  if  you  were  to  breathe  in their  general  area  if  you  were  pregnant.  Of  course,  this  list  changes  from  year  to  year  so  take most  of  these  recommendations  with  a  grain  of  salt!   If  you‟re  unsure  whether  a  food  is  safe  for  you  to  eat,  or  if  you  have  heard  mixed  reports  or have  a  concern  based  on  your  individual  circumstances,  consult  your  OB/GYN.  Since  they  are regularly  required  to  take  continuing  education  classes  and  receive  frequent  updates  from  the research  fields  they  would  be  the  most  qualified  to  provide  you  with  information  pertaining specifically  to  your  pregnancy. Alcohol  is  first  on  the  list  of  No-No‟s  for  Mommies  to  Be,  and  with  good  reason.  The amount  of  alcohol  that  is  safe  to  consume  in  a  day  while  pregnant  has  yet  to  be  determined,  and the  incidence  of  known  cases  of  birth  defects  due  to  alcohol  consumption  is  on  the  rise. According  to  the  March  of  Dimes  “alcohol  is  the  most  common  known  cause  of  damage  to developing  babies  in  the  United  States  and  is  the  leading  cause  of  preventable  mental retardation.”   On a  more  personal  note,  alcohol  can  also  aggravate  many  of  the  common  side  effects  of pregnancy  such  as  nausea  and  heartburn.  It  also  takes  up  space  in  your  stomach  that  could  be filled  with  more  healthy  things,  like  water  or  juice.  If  you  can  forsake  alcohol  completely  during your  pregnancy,  that  would  be  the  best  choice  for  you  and  your  baby.  Does  that  mean  that  a  sip of  your  glass  when  you  toast  your  cousin‟s  wedding  is  going  to  leave  your  baby  scarred  for  life? No,  probably  not.  Use  your  good  sense.  While  a  sip  or  two  of  wine  every  now  and  then  probably won‟t  hurt  your  growing  angel,  a  shot  or  two  of  tequila  might  not  be  as  forgiving.  Pregnancy  is only  nine  months  long.  Your  baby  lasts  a  lifetime. The  other  scare  when  it  comes  to  pregnancy  eating  has  come  from  an  unexpected  sourcefish.  Long  lauded  as  the  best  source  of  protein  for  pregnant  women,  it  was  recently  discovered that  fish  was  also  high  in  mercury,  a  condition  caused  by  the  dumping  of  waste  into  the  water. Mercury  can  cause  irreparable  damage  to  a  fetus‟s  developing  nervous  system.  The  debate  as  to whether  specific  fish  can  be  considered  safe  or  not  is  still  ongoing,  but  pregnant  women  are currently  being  encouraged  to  avoid  shark,  swordfish,  king  mackerel,  tilefish,  bluefish,  tuna steak,  striped  bass,  freshwater  fish  and  canned  tuna. While  highly  processed  foods  may  not  cause  permanent  damage  to  your  unborn  baby they  usually  contain  enough  preservatives  to  qualify  them  as  highly  suspicious.  Remember, anything  that  claims  to  be  sugar  free  yet  tastes  sweet  has  some  form  of  sugar  substitute  in  it.  The question  is,  what  are  they  substituting?  Labels  such  as  “fat  free”  and  “caffeine  free”  should  also be  approached  with  caution.  Take  the  high  road  here  and  attempt  to  buy  whole,  natural  foods  as often  as  possible.  Look  at  the  list  of  ingredients  on  the  label.  The  longer  it  is,  the  less  likely  it  is to  be  healthy  for  your  baby If  you  have  a  hard  time  getting  started  in  the  morning  without  your  cup  of  Joe,  now‟s  going to  be  the  time  to  learn.  Caffeine  impedes  iron  absorption,  contributing  to  anemia  in  pregnant women  who  don‟t  have  enough  to  spare,  robs  the  body  of  precious  calcium  and  aggravates heartburn  all  in  one  fell  swoop.  It  also  transfers  to  your  baby  through  your  breastmilk,  which means  that  if  you  like  to  drink  coffee  and  you‟re  planning  on  breastfeeding  you  can  expect  a  lot of  late  nights.   Although  you  could  switch  to  decaf,  for  the  dedicated  coffee  drinker  this  is  about  the equivalent  of  taking  a  perfectly  good  cup  of  coffee  and  filling  it  2/3  full  of  water.  As  a  placebo it‟s  a  poor  substitute.  Instead,  try  a  cup  of  hot  chocolate  or  apple  cider  in  the  morning.  (Heating apple  juice  and  adding  a  little  cinnamon  works  too.)  The  hot  beverage  will  hit  a  few  of  the  “wake up”  buttons  that  coffee  triggers,  and  while  you‟ll  probably  feel  the  lack  of  caffeine  for  the  first week  or  two  you  should  find  that  getting  through  the  day  gets  easier-and  hey,  pregnant  women are  supposed  to  nap  regularly  anyway! Unpasteurized  cheeses,  soft  or  fresh  cheeses  such  as  Brie,  deli  meats,  hot  dogs, undercooked  eggs,  fish,  rare  to  medium  well  meats  and  unpasteurized  juices  are  also  being  added at  various  intervals  to  the  “no-no”  list  that  OB/GYNs  are  handing  out  to  their  patients  in  an attempt  to  stop  the  spread  of  pathogens  such  as  E.coli,  Salmonella  and  Listeria,  all  of  which  are often  present  in  undercooked  or  uncooked  meats.   Listeria,  the  leading  cause  of  meningitis  in  children  less  than  one  year  old,  has  the  ability to  cross  the  placenta  and  infect  the  baby.  It  can  also  cause  miscarriage.  Salmonella  has  been associated  with  stillbirth.  Even  if  fetal  death  doesn‟t  occur,  dehydration  from  the  diarrhea  and vomiting  that  accompany  Salmonella  infection  is  a  serious  risk.  A  severe  infection  with  E.  coli can  cause  dehydration  as  well  as  potentially  triggering  premature  labor  or  miscarriage. By the  same  token,  it  is  vitally  important  that  you  wash  your  fruits  and  vegetables thoroughly  before  you  eat  them,  particularly  if  you  grow  your  own.  You  were  probably  told  by your  physician  that  while  you  were  pregnant  you  shouldn‟t  handle  kitty  litter  due  to  a  potential infection  with  Toxoplasma,  a  parasite  that  lives  in  cat  feces.  Toxoplasma  is  also  present  in  the soil,  particularly  in  areas  where  cats  often  roam  and  do  their  business  outside.  There  is  always  a risk  of  Toxoplasma  appearing  in  commercially  processed  foods,  although  it  is  less  common  than in  home  grown.   It  is  better  to  be  safe  than  sorry  when  dealing  with  Toxoplasma.  The  parasite  can  cross the  placenta,  infecting  the  baby  and  causing  stillbirth  or  long  term  damage.  There  is  a  15% chance  of  the  parasite  infecting  the  baby  if  exposure  occurs  in  the  first  trimester,  30%  in  the second  and  60%  in  the  third.   Pathogenic  infection  of  the  developing  fetus  can  be  potentially  devastating,  particularly  when it  is  caused  by  an  invader  that  an  adult  immune  system  would  be  able  to  battle  off  with  ease.  It  is far  better  to  take  the  time  to  carefully  ensure  that  your  food  is  pathogen  free  during  pregnancy than  to  have  to  live  with  the  consequences.

What  if  You  Can’t  Eat  a  Regular  Diet? As  children  are  exposed  to  more  foods  at  an  earlier  age  the  incidence  of  food  allergy  and intolerance  is  rising.  Add  to  this  the  problems  of  diabetes,  vegan  and  vegetarianism,  metabolic disorders  and  general  dislikes  and  you  can  come  up  with  an  equation  that  equals  trouble  for  a pregnant  woman.  The  question  is,  what  do  you  do  when  you  can‟t  eat  a  regular  pregnancy  diet? The  answer  is,  get  creative!  If  you  suffer  from  diabetes  or  a  digestive  disorder,  or  you have  a  major  metabolic  disorder  such  as  PKU  or  tyrosinemia  (and  these  are  only  a  few  from  a very  long  list  that  are  usually  diagnosed  during  early  childhood)  you  probably  have  a  pretty  good idea  of  how  to  manage  your  diet  to  provide  the  most  nutrients  at  a  time  without  overdoing  it.  To be  safe,  however,  it  would  be  wise  to  speak  with  your  doctor  about  what  foods  you  can  and cannot  have  (and  in  what  amounts  you  are  allowed  to  have  them)  in  the  coming  months.   If  you  do  not  have  a  condition  that  requires  specific,  direct  medical  supervision  and simply  need  to  make  some  changes  to  the  diet  shown  earlier  you‟re  going  to  find  that  it‟s  going to  be  much  simpler  than  you  would  think  (although  you‟re  probably  going  to  be  pretty  sick  of your  core  foods  by  the  time  you  deliver!)  With  some  dietary  substitutions,  however,  you  should still  be  able  to  maintain  a  healthy  diet  throughout  the  course  of  your  pregnancy. Food  Allergies  and  Intolerance Food  allergies,  particularly  those  to  milk,  soy,  nuts  and  wheat,  can  be  a  major  issue  when it  comes  to  maintaining  a  proper  diet.  It‟s  very  hard  to  get  enough  calcium  when  you  can‟t  drink a  single  glass  of  milk  or  eat  a  milk  product!  The  key  here  is  to  talk  to  your  doctor  about recommending  some  healthy  substitutions.  There  are  some,  such  as  a  milk  allergy  or  a  peanut allergy,  that  are  easy  to  work  around  with  calcium  fortified  juices  and  chewable  supplements  and other  sources  of  protein.   If  you  have  either  one  of  these  allergies  you  should  be  very  careful  to  keep  your  food essentially  isolated,  something  which  you  are  undoubtedly  already  aware  of.  Many  smoothies and  “Meals  in  a  Box”  contain  these  ingredients  in  some  quantity  or  another.  The  severity  of  your allergy  should  be  considered  when  you‟re  choosing  your  foods,  but  if  you  suffer  from anaphylaxis  you  are  going  to  want  to  stay  clear  of  them  altogether.  Choose  plain  meats  and  fresh fruits  and  vegetables  over  stews  and  casseroles,  and  try  to  avoid  gravies  if  you  can‟t  see  the  list of  ingredients. Occasionally  allergic  reactions  will  be  more  intense  in  pregnancy,  so  if  you  had  a  mild reaction  to  certain  foods  before  you  were  pregnant  you  should  handle  them  with  care  now. Remember,  pregnancy  is  only  nine  months  long.  Your  body  should  go  back  to  normal  when  it‟s all  said  and  done  and  you  can  go  back  to  your  favorite  foods  and  drinks  then.  Until  then,  it  never hurts  to  err  on  the  side  of  paranoia.

If  you  have  an  allergy  to  wheat  or  soy  you  may  have  a  bit  more  trouble,  since  many  of  the foods  you  are  going  to  need  to  eat  to  get  your  servings  of  carbohydrates  are  going  to  contain these  ingredients.  (Unless  you  actually  have  a  soy  allergy  you  are  probably  unaware  of  how  often it‟s  mixed  in  with  many  foods.)    You  are  going  to  have  to  carefully  read  the  labels  on  the  foods you  eat,  checking  for  any  of  the  following  words:   Soy   Soy flour   Soy cheese   Soy protein   Textured  soy  protein   Textured  vegetable  protein   Tofu   Vegetable  protein   Yuba   Edamame   Tempeh   Mono-diglyceride   Natto   Okara   Soya,  soja,  soybean,  soyabeans   Wheat   Bulgur   Couscous   Enriched/white/whole  wheat  flour   Farina   Gluten   Graham  flour   Kamut   Semolina   Triticale   Wheat bran/germ You‟ll  find  these  included  in  many  bread  products,  so  it  would  be  prudent  to  get  your carbohydrates  from  other  sources.  The  list  of  nutrient  sources  provides  you  with  some  acceptable alternatives,  so  don‟t  feel  that  you  have  to  eat  a  particular  food  just  because  it‟s  on  your  list.  If you  have  preexisting  health  conditions  they  must  be  considered  first.  Many  women  with  a  mild milk  allergy  or  wheat  allergy  will  deliberately  deal  with  the  side  effects  in  the  interest  of providing  their  babies  with  vital  nutrients.  Pregnancy  is  uncomfortable  enough  without  adding  to it  by  making  yourself  sick! If  you  are  unsure  about  which  foods  can  be  substituted  in  your  diet  without  causing  you to  lose  nutritional  value  make  an  appointment  to  speak  with  the  nutritionist  at  your  physician‟s office  or  local  health  department.  They  are  specially  trained  to  help  people  with  dietary

Children  grow  up  too  fast.  Before  too  long  the  almost  indistinguishable  speck  in  your womb  is  going  to  be  flying  down  a  hill  on  a  bike  with  their  hands  in  the  air  and  driving  down  the interstate  in  your  new  car.  Before  you  know  it  you’ll  be  telling  them  good-bye  as  they  start college,  crossing  your  fingers  and  hoping  for  the  best.  You’ll  never  have  the  opportunity  to nurture  them  again  that  you  do  right  now,  when  they’re  safely  inside  you  tucked  away  from  the outside  world. This  is  going  to  be  the  last  time  in  your  life  that  it’s  a  piece  of  cake  to  get  them  to  eat their  vegetables,  so  enjoy  it!  You’re  going  to  spend  the  next  eighteen  years  (and  then  some) trying  to  convince  them  that  spinach  is  good  for  them  and  that  the  slimy  stuff  on  the  outside  of their  carrots  is  just  pulp,  but  right  now  you’re  making  all  the  decisions  when  it  comes  to  what they  eat. Proper  pregnancy  nutrition  is  a  vital  factor  in  proper  fetal  development  because  the  fetus is  physically  incapable  of  providing  for  itself,  nor  can  it  show  any  visible  signs  of malnourishment  between  monthly  check-ups  as  a  newborn  can.  That  means  that  for  the  next  nine months  it’s  going  to  be  completely  up  to  you  to  ensure  that  you  are  properly  eating  for  two, taking  in  the  vitamins  and  nutrients  that  are  going  to  help  you  give  birth  to  a  healthy,  happy  baby while  keeping  yourself  healthy  at  the  same  time. Remember,  baby’s  going  to  take  what  it  needs  long  before  those  nutrients  ever  have  the opportunity  to  go  through  your  system.    By  not  eating  properly  you’re  not  only  harming  your baby,  you’re  harming  yourself  as  well.  That’s  why  it’s  so  important  that  you  make  sure  you  get the  vitamins  and  nutrients  that  you  need  for  the  next  nine  months  as  well.  Lack  of  attention  might still  lead  to  a  healthy  baby,  but  baby’s  not  going  to  change  themselves!  Mom  needs  to  be  healthy too  in  order  to  keep  up  with  her  little  bundle  of  joy  in  the  coming  months.  Giving birth is  hard enough  on  the  body.  You  certainly  don’t  want  to  add  malnutrition  into  the  mix. The  problem  that  many  women  face  when  it  comes  to  pregnancy  nutrition  is  that  they simply  don’t  understand.  Why?  Not  because  they’re  stupid,  or  because  they  don’t  want  to  do what’s  best  for  their  baby.  It’s  because  most  books  on  pregnancy,  particularly  those  that  deal with  the  ins  and  outs  of  nutrition  for  the  next  nine  months,  are  written  by  medical  professionals. That makes sense, right?  Who  better  to  take  advice  from  concerning  the  growth  and  development of  your  baby  than  the  doctor  that’s  made  it  their  life’s  work? Most  moms  aren’t  doctors,  however,  and  that’s  where  the  trouble  comes  in.  It’s  all  well and  good  to  sit  down  and  look  at  a  chart  that  shows  how  much  of  each  mineral  you’re  supposed to  take  in  on  a  daily  basis  over  the  next  nine  months,  but  if  you  don’t  understand  what  you’re reading  and  the  effect  it’s  going  to  have  on  your  baby  then  it  isn’t  going  to  do  you  a  whole  lot  of good.  You’re  going  to  spend  a  month,  maybe  two,  looking  at  the  labels  on  the  back  of  your  food. Then  you’re  going  to  get  sick  of  it  and  go  back  to  your  old  eating  habits,  reasoning  that  you’ve always  been  healthy.  You’re taking your prenatal vitamins.  What could go  wrongFrom  A to Zinc If  you  have  ever  attempted  to  go  on  any  kind  of  diet  that  involved  reading  the  information on  the  nutritional  labels  of  your  food  you  are  all  too  familiar  with  the  fact  that  those  little  words and  symbols  can  start  to  look  like  Greek  after  a  while.  If  you‟re  not  a  doctor  or  a  nutritionist  you probably  have  no  idea  of  what  Vitamin  B  or  Folic  Acid  are,  much  less  why  they‟re  important. The  first  step  to  conquering  pregnancy  nutrition  is  understanding  what  you’re  eating,  how  much you  should  eat,  why  you’re  eating  it  and  how  it’s  going  to  help  your  baby. A quick  note.  In  the  following  section  you  are  going  to  see  several  mentions  made  about the  negative  consequences  of  overdosing  on  specific  vitamins.  You  must  understand  that  this overdose  very  rarely  occurs  because  of  the  foods  you  eat.  More  often  it  is  because  mothers  have chosen  to  consume  extra  supplements  in  an  attempt  to  “help”  their  baby  or  they  have  forgotten  to tell  their  physician  about  other  vitamins  and  supplements  they  take  on  a  regular  basis.  Be  sure when  you  go  in  for  your  prenatal  appointments  that  your  physician  knows  exactly  what  vitamins, medications  and  supplements  (including  herbal)  you  take,  regardless  of  how  insignificant  you may  believe  them  to  be.

 1.  Vitamin  A:  Vitamin  A  helps  the  development  of  baby‟s  bones  and  teeth,  as  well  as their  heart,  ears,  eyes  and  immune  system  (the  body  system  that  fights  infection). Vitamin  A  deficiency  has  been  associated  with  vision  problems,  which  is  why  your mom always  told  you  to  eat  your  carrots  when  you  were  a  kid!  Getting  enough Vitamin  A  during  pregnancy  will  also  help  your  body  repair  the  damage  caused  by childbirth.   Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  770  micrograms  (or  2565  IU,  as  it  is  labeled on  nutritional  labels)  of  Vitamin  A  per  day,  and  that  number  almost  doubles  when nursing  to  1300  micrograms  (4,330  IU).  Be  aware,  however,  that  overdosing  on Vitamin  A  can  cause  birth  defects  and  liver  toxicity.  Your  maximum  intake  should  be 3000  mcg  (10,000  IU)  per  day.   Vitamin  A  can  be  found  in  liver,  carrots,  sweet  potatoes,  kale  spinach  collard  greens, cantaloupe,  eggs,  mangos  and  peas.

 2.  Vitamin  B6:  Also  known  as  Pyridoxine,  Vitamin  B6  helps  your  baby‟s  brain  and nervous  system  develop.  It  also  helps  Mom  and  baby  develop  new  red  blood  cells. Oddly  enough,  B6  has  been  known  to  help  alleviate  morning  sickness  in  some pregnant  women. Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  1.9  mg  per  day  of  Vitamin  B6.  That  amount rises  slightly  when  nursing  to  2.0  mg  per  day. Vitamin  B6  can  be  found  in  fortified  cereals,  as  well  as  bananas,  baked  potatoes, watermelon,  chick  peas  and  chicken  breast.

 3.  Vitamin  B12:  Vitamin  B12  works  hand  in  hand  with  folic  acid  to  help  both  Mom  and baby  produce  healthy  red  blood  cells,  and  it  helps  develop  the  fetal  brain  and  nervous system.  The  body  stores  years‟  worth  of  B12  away,  so  unless  you  are  a  vegan  or suffer  from  pernicious  anemia  the  likelihood  of  a  B12  deficiency  is  very  slim. Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  2.6  mcg  (104  IU)  of  B12per  day,  nursing mothers  2.8  mcg  (112  IU). Vitamin  B12  can  be  found  in  red  meat,  poultry,  fish,  shellfish,  eggs  and  dairy  foods. If  you  are  a  vegan  you  will  be  able  to  find  B12  fortified  tofu  and  soymilk.  Other  foods are  fortified  at  the  manufacturer‟s  discretion.

 4.  Vitamin  C:  Vitamin  C  helps  the  body  to  absorb  iron  and  build  a  healthy  immune system  in  both  mother  and  baby.  It  also  holds  the  cells  together,  helping  the  body  to build  tissue.  Since  the  Daily  Recommended  Allowance  of  Vitamin  C  is  so  easy  to consume  by  eating  the  right  foods  supplementation  is  rarely  needed. Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  80-85  mg  of  Vitamin  C  per  day,  nursing mothers  no  less  than  120  mg  per  day. Vitamin  C  can  be  found  in  citrus  fruits,  raspberries,  bell  peppers,  green  beans, strawberries,  papaya,  potatoes,  broccoli  and  tomatoes,  as  well  as  in  many  cough  drops and  other  supplements.

 5.  Calcium:  Calcium  builds  your  baby‟s  bones  and  helps  its  brain  and  heart  to  function. Calcium  intake  increases  dramatically  during  pregnancy.  Women  with  calcium deficiency  at  any  point  in  their  lives  are  more  likely  to  suffer  from  conditions  such  as osteoporosis  which  directly  affect  the  bones.   Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  1200  mg  of  calcium  a  day,  nursing  mothers 1000  mg  per  day. Calcium  can  be  found  in  dairy  products,  such  as  milk,  cheese,  yogurt  and,  to  a  lesser extent,  ice  cream,  as  well  as  fortified  juices,  butters  and  cereals,  spinach,  broccoli, okra,  sweet  potatoes,  lentils,  tofu,  Chinese  cabbage,  kale  and  broccoli.  It  is  also widely  available  in  supplement  form.

 6.  Vitamin  D:  Vitamin  D  helps  the  body  absorb  calcium,  leading  to  healthy  bones  for both  mother  and  baby.   Women  who  are  pregnant  or  nursing  should  consume  at  least  2000  IU  of  Vitamin  D per  day.  Since  babies  need  more  Vitamin  D  than  adults  babies  that  are  only breastfeeding  may  need  a  Vitamin  D  supplement,  so  if  your  doctor  recommends  this don‟t  worry.  You  haven‟t  done  anything  wrong!  Formula  is  fortified  with  Vitamin  D, so  if  you  are  bottle  feeding  or  supplementing  with  formula  your  baby  is  probably getting  sufficient  amounts  of  this  vital  nutrient. Vitamin  D  is  rarely  found  in  sufficient  amounts  in  ordinary  foods.  It  can,  however,  be found  in  milk  (most  milk  is  fortified)  as  well  as  fortified  cereals,  eggs  and  fatty  fish like  salmon,  catfish  and  mackerel.  Vitamin  D  is  also  found  in  sunshine,  so  women and  children  found  to  have  a  mild  Vitamin  D  deficiency  may  be  told  to  spend  more time  in  the  sun.

 7.  Vitamin  E:  Vitamin  E  helps  baby‟s  body  to  form  and  use  its  muscles  and  red  blood cells.  Lack  of  Vitamin  E  during  pregnancy  has  been  associated  with  pre-eclampsia  (a condition  causing  excessively  high  blood  pressure  and  fluid  retention)  and  low  birth weight.  On  the  other  hand,  Vitamin  E  overdose  has  been  tentatively  associated  with stillbirth  in  mothers  who  “self  medicated”  with  supplements. Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  20  mg  of  Vitamin  E  per  day  but  not  more than  540  mg. Vitamin  E  can  be  found  in  naturally  in  vegetable  oil,  wheat  germ,  nuts,  spinach  and fortified  cereals  as  well  as  in  supplemental  form.  Natural  Vitamin  E  is  better  for  your baby  than  synthetic,  so  be  sure  to  eat  lots  of  Vitamin  E  rich  foods  before  you  reach for  your  bottle  of  supplements.

 8.  Folic  Acid:  Also  known  as  Folate  or  Vitamin  B9,  Folic  Acid  is  a  vital  part  of  your baby‟s  development.  The  body  uses  Folic  Acid  for  the  replication  of  DNA,  cell growth  and  tissue  formation.  A  Folic  Acid  deficiency  during  pregnancy  can  lead  to neural  tube  defects  such  as  spina  bifida  (a  condition  in  which  the  spinal  cord  does  not form  completely),  anencephaly  (underdevelopment  of  the  brain)  and  encephalocele  (a condition  in  which  brain  tissue  protrudes  out  to  the  skin  from  an  abnormal  opening  in the  skull).  All  of  these  conditions  occur  during  the  first  28  days  of  fetal  development, usually  before  Mom  even  knows  she‟s  pregnant,  which  is  why  it‟s  important  for women  who  may  become  or  are trying  to  become  pregnant  to  consistently  get  enough Folic  Acid  in  their  diet. Pregnant  woman  should  consume  at  least  0.6-0.8  mg  of  Folic  Acid  per  day. Folic  Acid  can  be  found  in  oranges,  orange  juice,  strawberries,  leafy  vegetables, spinach,  beets,  broccoli,  cauliflower,  peas,  pasta,  beans,  nuts  and  sunflower  seeds,  as well  as  in  supplements  and  fortified  cereals.

 9.  Iron:  Iron  helps  your  body  to  form  the  extra  blood  that  it‟s  going  to  need  to  keep  you and  baby  healthy,  as  well  as  helping  to  form  the  placenta  and  develop  the  baby‟s cells.  Women  are  rarely  able  to  consume  enough  iron  during  their  pregnancy  through eating  alone,  so  iron  supplements  along  with  prenatal  vitamins  are  often  prescribed. Women  who are  pregnant  should  have  at  least  27  mg  of  iron  per  day,  although  the Center  for  Disease  Control  suggests  that  all  women  take  a  supplement  containing  at least  30  mg.  The  extra  iron  rarely  causes  side  effects;  however,  overdosing  on  iron supplements  can  be  very  harmful  for  both  you  and  your  baby  by  causing  iron  build-up in  the  cells.   Iron  can  be  found  in  red  meat  and  poultry,  which  are  your  best  choice,  as  well  as legumes,  vegetables,  some  grains  and  fortified  cereals.

10.  Niacin:  Also  known  as  Vitamin  B3,  Niacin  is  responsible  for  providing  energy  for your  baby  to  develop  as  well  as  building  the  placenta.  It  also  helps  keep  Mom‟s digestive  system  operating  normally. Pregnant  women  should  have  an  intake  of  at  least  18  mg  of  Niacin  per  day. Niacin  can  be  found  in  foods  that  are  high  in  protein,  such  as  eggs,  meats,  fish  and peanuts,  as  well  as  whole  grains,  bread  products,  fortified  cereals  and  milk.

 11.    Protein:  Protein  is  the  building  block  of  the  body‟s  cells,  and  as  such  it  is  very important  to  the  growth  and  development  of  every  part  of  your  baby‟s  body  during pregnancy.  This  is  especially  important  in  the  second  and  third  trimester,  when  both Mom and baby are  growing  the  fastest. Pregnant  and  nursing  women  should  consume  at  least  70g  of  protein  per  day,  which  is about  25g  more  than  the  average  women  needs  before  pregnancy. Protein  can  be  found  naturally  in  beans,  poultry,  red  meats,  fish,  shellfish,  eggs,  milk, cheese,  tofu  and  yogurt.  It  is  also  available  in  supplements,  fortified  cereals  and protein  bars.

 12.  Riboflavin:  Also  known  as  Vitamin  B2,  Riboflavin  helps  the  body  produce  the  energy it  needs  to  develop  your  baby‟s  bones,  muscles  and  nervous  system.  Women  with Riboflavin  deficiency  may  be  at  risk  for  preeclamsia,  and  when  baby  is  delivered  it will  be  prone  to  anemia,  digestive  problems,  poor  growth  and  a  suppressed  immune system,  making  it  more  vulnerable  to  infection. Pregnant  women  should  consume  at  least  1.4  mg  of  Riboflavin  per  day,  nursing mothers  1.6  mg. Riboflavin  can  be  found  in  whole  grains,  dairy  products,  red  meat,  pork  and  poultry, fish,  fortified  cereals  and  eggs.   

 13.  Thiamin:  Also  known  as  Vitamin  B1,  thiamin  helps  develop  your  baby‟s  organs  and central  nervous  system.   Pregnant  women  and  nursing  mothers  should  consume  at  least  1.4  mg  of  Thiamin  a day.  Nursing  mothers  who  are  Thiamin  deficient  are  at  risk  for  having  babies  with beriberi,  a  disease  which  may  affect  the  baby‟s  cardiovascular  system  (lungs  and heart)  or  the  nervous  system. Thiamin  can  be  found  in  whole  grain  foods,  pork,  fortified  cereals,  wheat  germ  and eggs.

 14.  Zinc:  Zinc  is  vital  for  the  growth  of  your  fetus  because  it  aids  in  cell  division,  the primary  process  in  the  growth  of  baby‟s  tiny  tissues  and  organs.  It  also  helps  Mom and  baby  to  produce  insulin  and  other  enzymes. Pregnant  women  should  have  an  intake  of  at  least  11-12  mg  of  Zinc  per  day. Zinc  can  be  found  naturally  in  red  meats,  poultry,  beans,  nuts,  grains,  oysters  and dairy  products,  as  well  as  fortified  cereals  and  supplements.

STOP

 Bear  in  mind  that  the  Recommended  Daily  Allowances  are  just  that-recommended.  None of  those  number  has  been  formulated  on  a  case-by-case  basis,  so  if  your  doctor  recommends something  else  for  you  listen  to  what  they  have  to  say.  After  all,  they  managed  to  run  up  that student  loan  somehow! Calories Now that  you‟re  familiar  with  the  various  vitamins  and  minerals  that  you  are  going  to need  to  have  during  pregnancy  let‟s  touch  on  another  topic  that  is  near  and  dear  to  the  female heart-calories.  In  light  of  society‟s  avid  love  affair  with  scrawny  women,  women  who  are  less than  thin  have  developed  a  major  complex  when  it  comes  to  calories.  They  count  them,  they  burn them,  they  measure  them,  and  they  factor  them.  They  avoid  them  whenever  possible  and  are enthusiastic  consumers  of  anything  that  has  the  words  “low”  and  “calorie”  printed  on  them.  In short,  women  have  made  battling  against  calories  their  lifelong  mission,  dedicating  themselves  to it  with  a  fervency  that  would  equal  any  religious  zealot  in  the  world.   Caloric  Intake  During  Pregnancy The  first  thing  you  must  understand  is  that  pregnancy  is  not  the  time  to  be  counting calories.  If  you  are  on  a  diet  that  involves  severely  restricting  your  caloric  intake  get  off  it.  Right now.  For  the  next  nine  months  you  have  permission  to  not  suffer  for  beauty.  Not  only  is restricting  calories  not  going  to  result  in  weight  loss  (you‟re  going  to  gain  some  as  the  baby grows  whether  you  like  it  or  not)  it  could  potentially  harm  your  baby.   Not  getting  enough  calories  during  pregnancy  can  lead  to  the  baby  not  having  what  it needs  to  develop  properly.  Low  birth  weight  is  a  common  complication,  as  is  poor  fetal development.  The  baby  may  have  any  number  of  deficiency-associated  birth  defects.  In  short,  it is  vitally  important  that  when  you  are  pregnant  you  get  enough  to  eat.  You  can  burn  it  all  off after  the  baby  is  born,  although  to  be  honest  if  you  have  time  to  worry  about  your  weight  you will  be  handling  new  motherhood  much  better  than  most! The  first  thing  you  want  to  do  is  calculate  your  pre-pregnancy  Recommended  Daily Caloric  Intake.  If  you  are  a  health  buff  or  have  been  living  on  a  terminal  diet  you  may  already know  this  number.  If  you  do  not  you  can  visit  one  of  the  following  sites  to  figure  it  out,  or consult  with  your  physician.   http://www.globalrph.com/dieting_calc.htm   http://www.yeraze.com/scripts/calories.php   http://pregnancychildbirth.suite101.com/article.cfm/eating_for_two (this  site  will  also provide  practical  advice  about  estimating  caloric  intake  for  the  rest  of  your pregnancy,  although  it  doesn‟t  take  into  account  weight  gain  or  loss.) For  the  first  three  months  of  your  pregnancy  you  actually  do  not  need  to  consume  any extra  calories.  Your  pre-pregnancy  calorie  consumption  will  be  perfectly  adequate  for  your baby‟s  growth  and  development  as  long  as  you  are  not  dieting.  If  you  are  dieting,  stop!  This  is the  number  of  calories  (roughly)  that  you  want  to  eat  in  a  day. As  you  go  into  your  second  and  third  trimester  you  should  increase  your  daily  caloric intake  by  300  calories.  This  will  help  to  compensate  for  the  increasing  rate  of  your  baby‟s growth.  If  your  pre-pregnancy  caloric  intake  was  1800  calories  you  should  consume  2100   calories  a  day.  If  it  was  1400  calories  you  should  consume  1700  calories,  and  so  on  and  so  forth. Again,  this  is  not  the  time  to  try  and  lose  weight.  Do  not  omit  these  extra  calories  in  favor  of allowing  your  body  to  burn  them  instead.  This  is  not  healthy  for  you  or  your  baby,  and  if  you  are breastfeeding  you  will  quickly  work  these  calories  back  off.   The  number  of  calories  you  need  during  pregnancy  is  going  to  vary  if  you  were  not  a  healthy weight  when  you  became  pregnant.  Women  who  were  obese  may  be  told  to  consume  fewer calories  to  prevent  excessive  weight  gain,  which  would  place  extra  strain  on  the  heart  and  lungs and  increase  the  likelihood  of  blood  pressure  related  problems  during  pregnancy.  In  this  case  this is  a  fine  time  to  diet,  as  long  as  you  are  following  your  doctor‟s  advice.  The  healthier  you  are,  the healthier  your  baby  is  going  to  be. On the  flip  side  of  that  coin,  if  you  were  underweight  at  the  beginning  of  your  pregnancy  or have  not  gained  what  the  doctor  considers  to  be  an  adequate  amount  of  weight  since  becoming pregnant  you  may  be  told  to  increase  your  caloric  intake  by  more  than  300.    The  baby  needs  to be  able  to  take  enough  calories  away  from  your  body  to  grow,  and  if  you  don‟t  have  any  to  spare either  because  you  aren‟t  eating  enough  or  your  body  is  burning  everything  that  you  eat  they  are going  to  suffer. www.weightlossnook.com

Caloric  Intake  While  Nursing Nursing  mothers  generally  need  500  calories  more  a  day  than  their  pre-pregnancy Recommended  Daily  Allowance.  This  takes  into  consideration  the  fact  that  the  average breastfeeding  infant  consumes  650  calories  a  day,  which  is  why  breastfeeding  mothers  generally lose  weight  much  more  quickly  than  their  bottle  feeding  counterparts.  The  weight  you  gained while  pregnant  will  make  up  the  difference.  That‟s  an  instant  weight  loss  of  150  calories  per  day just  by  doing  what  comes  naturally!  (For  reference  sake,  that‟s  roughly  the  equivalent  of  fifteen minutes  of  running  or  stair  climbing.) Those  nursing  twins  or  who  had  little  weight  gain  during  pregnancy  may  to  eat  more calories  in  a  day  because  their  bodies  will  not  have  enough  extra  weight  to  compensate.  Again, your  baby  is  getting  the  calories  it  needs  from  your  body.  If  you  do  not  have  enough  calories  to spare  to  create  an  adequate  amount  of  breast  milk  your  baby  will  go  hungry,  forcing  you  to  either up  your  caloric  intake  or  begin  to  supplement.   Healthy  Calories  Vs.  Unhealthy  Calories It  is  important  to  note  at  this  time  that  no  two  calories  are  created  equal.  There  are  300 calories  in  a  protein  bar  and  a  banana  smoothie,  and  there  are  300  calories  in  the  average  piece  of cheesecake.  Guess  which  one  is  going  to  be  better  for  your  baby? The  difficult  part  of  counting  calories  when  you‟re  pregnant  is  that  you  need  to  maintain a  careful  balance  on  several  levels.  First  and  foremost,  you  want  to  make  sure  that  you‟re  eating enough  to  give  your  baby  what  it  needs.  Secondly,  you  want  to  make  sure  that  the  calories  you are  eating  are  “good”  calories,  calories  coming  from  foods  that  are  going  to  provide  your  baby with  nutritional  benefit  as  well.   On the  flip  side,  you  do  not  want  to  consume  too  many  calories.  If  you  do  you  will  gain too  much  weight,  potentially  putting  you  at  risk  for  early  labor,  pre-eclamsia,  diabetes  and  heart problems.  You  also  do  not  want  to  restrict  your  food  intake  too  much.  Pregnancy  can  lead  to some  pretty  intense  cravings,  and  ignoring  these  cravings  can  lead  women  to  do  some  crazy things.   Unless  you  have  one  of  the  weight  problems  mentioned  above  you  are  probably  better  off considering  your  calorie  intake  guidelines  to  be  just  that-guidelines.  It‟s  not  going  to  hurt  you  to go  over  every  once  in  a  while  and  indulge  in  a  piece  of  cheesecake  or  a  chocolate  chip  cookie. Just  don‟t  do  it  too  often  or  too  excessively.  (Binging  and  eating  a  half  a  gallon  of  chocolate  ice cream  once  isn‟t  going  to  hurt  you,  although  it  might  make  you  sick,  but  doing  it  every  day  could be  a  problem.) Try  not  to  count  your  “junky”  calories  as  part  of  your  daily  necessary  intake.  This  will help  you  to  continue  eating  the  required  number  of  “good”  calories  in  a  day,  making  sure  that your  baby  is  getting  the  nutrition  that  it  needs.  (That  half  gallon  of  ice  cream  is  going  to  account for  about  half  of  your  daily  caloric  intake,  which  means  that  half  of  the  calories  that  your  baby needs  to  grow  today  just  went  down  the  drain.)  It  is  also  going  to  help  keep  you  from  doing  it  too often,  since  consistently  eating  five  to  six  hundred  calories  over  your  recommended  daily  intake is  going  to  lead  to  excessive  weight  gain.  The  first  time  you  step  on  the  doctor‟s  scale  and  see you‟ve  gained  ten  pounds  in  a  month  the  urge  to  binge  flies  out  the  window! Junk  food  aside,  not  all  “good”  calories  are  created  equal  either.  Here  are  some  basic guidelines  for  choosing  calories  that  are  going  to  meet  your  caloric  needs,  your  nutritional  needs and  your  basic  food  desires.  You  have  doubtlessly  at  some  point  in  your  life  gone  on  a  diet  that has  required  you  to  limit  yourself  to  certain  types  of  foods.  The  Adkins  diet,  for  example, severely  limits  your  carbohydrates,  while  the  Sonoma  Diet  cuts  your  dairy  in  half.  What happened  when  you  gave  this  diet  a  try?  Unless  you  are  extremely  creative  (or  have  an  incredible amount  of  self  control)  you  probably  stuck  to  this  diet  for  a  short  while,  then  tossed  it  to  the wayside. The  trick  to  eating  healthy  when  you  are  pregnant  is  the  same  as  eating  healthy  when you‟re  not.  You  have  to  recognize  what  foods  are  best  for  your  body  and  attempt  to  focus  on them  rather  than  their  more  tempting  and  less  healthy  counterparts.  When  you  are  choosing  the foods  you  will  eat  when  you  are  pregnant,  consider  the  following:   Is it  whole?  Whole  foods are  those  that  are  as  close  to  their  natural  form  as  possible rather  than  being  processed.  Fresh  fruits  and  vegetables  rather  than  canned,  whole grain  breads  rather  than  refined  white  and  real  cheese  fall  into  this  category.  Whole foods  are  especially  good  for  pregnant  women  because  the  fiber  and  water  contained in  them  makes  them  easier  to  digest.  This  not  only  helps  keep  you  from  being  even more  tired  than  you  already  are  because  your  body  is  struggling  to  digest  your  food, it  also  helps  you  to  decrease  your  chances  of  suffering  from  constipation.     Is it a  fruit  or  a  vegetable?  Fruits  and  veggies,  particularly  when  fresh  and/or  leafy and  green,  are  a  valuable  component  of  any  pregnancy  diet  because  most  necessary vitamins  can  be  found  in  them.  Look  below  for  a  quick  recap  of  necessary  vitamins and  the  foods  that  provide  them.   Is it a  good  carbohydrate  or  a  bad  carbohydrate?  You  cannot  eliminate  carbohydrates from  your  diet  entirely  when  you  are  pregnant.  They  provide  both  you  and  your  baby with  the  energy  that  you  both  need  to  grow  and  be  healthy.  What  you  can  do  is  make sure  that  the  carbohydrates  you  eat  are  good  for  you.  There  are  two  primary  classes of  carbohydrate,  simple  and  complex.  Simple  carbohydrates  are  made  of  small  sugar molecules  that  your  body  quickly  absorbs.  Examples  of  this  are  cakes,  white  breads, cookies,  candies  and  pastas.  These  are  the  carbohydrates  that  you  want  to  avoid because  they  will  give  you  a  quick  sugar  rush  then  leave  you  feeling  tired  and cranky-like  the  little  toes  digging  into  your  ribs  all  night  long  weren‟t  enough  to  do that! The  second  type  of  carbohydrate  is  a  complex  carbohydrate.  Complex  carbohydrates include  fiber  and  starches,  such  as  whole  grains  and  potatoes.  These  carbohydrates take  a  little  longer  to  digest,  leaving  you  feeling  fuller,  longer  and  giving  you  energy that  lasts  more  than  an  hour  or  two.  Of  course,  even  among  the  good  carbohydrates there  are  some  that  are  going  to  be  better  for  you  than  others.  If  you  are  having trouble  eating  due  to  morning  sickness  and  suffering  from  exhaustion  due  to hormonal  swings  this  is  important  to  know! In  order  to  get  the  most  punch  from  the  foods  you  eat  you  should  focus  on  eating those  that  provide  you  with  more  energy,  longer.  That  way  when  you  can‟t  eat  as much  as  you  did  your  baby  isn‟t  going  to  suffer.  Sweet  potatoes  and  real  whole  grain and  whole  wheat  products  are  your  best  choices,  as  well  as  fruits  such  as  grapes  and bananas.  Bear  in  mind  that  just  because  a  package  says  “whole  wheat”,  “whole grain”  or  “multigrain”  that  doesn‟t  necessarily  mean  that  it  is. Yes,  this  is  false  advertising  (sort  of)  but  it‟s  important  to  know.  A  food  is  only required  to  have  a  very  small  amount  of  whole  grain  in  order  to  claim  the  title legitimately.  It‟s  not  that  there  aren‟t  whole  grains  in  it,  it‟s  that  it‟s  not  all  whole grain.  There  are  usually  plenty  of  processed  and  refined  ingredients  included  as  well.   Are you eating  the  right  kinds  of  protein?  Like  carbohydrates  there  are  good  proteins and  there  are  so-so  proteins.  When  you‟re  looking  for  proteins  that  will  give  you  the most  bang  for  your  buck  you  should  focus  on  lean  meats,  eggs,  beef  and  beans.  The less  processed  it  is,  the  better  it  is  for  you.  Does  that  mean  you  can‟t  eat  those chicken  nuggets?  Certainly  not.  After  all,  when  the  sweet  and  sour  sauce  calls…It does  mean  that  you  shouldn‟t  allow  processed  meats  to  become  the  dominant  protein source  in  your  diet.   Is it  organic?  Organic  foods  are  usually  more  expensive  but  are  more  healthy  than their  counterparts.  Organic  foods,  as  defined  by  the  Healthy  Children  Project,  are those  that  are  grown  without  “pesticides  or  synthetic  (or  sewage-based)  fertilizers  for plant  materials  and  hormones  and  antibiotics  for  animals,  does  not  allow  genetic engineering  or  the  use  of  radiation,  and  emphasizes  the  utilization  of  renewable resources  as  well  as  the  conservation  of  land  and  water.” If  your  budget  won‟t  stretch  to  include  an  all-organic  diet  (unfortunately,  some  of those  products  came  with  a  pretty  hefty  shipping  fee)  attempt  to  focus  on  the  foods listed  by  the  government  as  the  best  to  be  bought  organically.  These  foods  are  those most  likely  to  be  contaminated  or  high  in  pesticides  and  include  apples,  bell  peppers, celery,  cherries,  grapes,  nectarines,  peaches,  pears,  potatoes,  raspberries,  spinach  and strawberries.   If  you  are  concerned  about  the  foods  you  are  eating  (and  not  buying  organically) peas,  pineapples,  papayas,  onions,  mangos,  kiwi,  sweet  corn,  cauliflower,  broccoli, bananas, avocados and asparagus have been judged the least likely to be contaminated or contain high amounts of pesticides.    What kind of fat is it? Your body needs certain types of fat, but trans fats (partially hydrogenated vegetable oil on the ingredients list) is difficult for your body to deal with and provides you with no nutritional value. Saturated fats are less healthy than unsaturated, are found in animal products such as butter and are best enjoyed in limited quantities. Recap-Necessary Vitamins and Their Sources  Vitamin Food Source   Vitamin A Liver, carrots, sweet potatoes, kale, spinach, collard greens, cantaloupe, eggs, mangos and peas Vitamin B6 Fortified cereals, bananas, baked potatoes, watermelon, chick peas and chicken breast Vitamin B12 Red meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs and dairy foods Vitamin C Citrus fruits, raspberries, bell peppers, green beans, strawberries, papaya, potatoes, broccoli and tomatoes Calcium Dairy products, fortified juices, fortified butters and fortified cereals, spinach, broccoli, okra, sweet potatoes, lentils, tofu, Chinese cabbage, kale and broccoli. Vitamin D Milk, fortified cereals, eggs and fatty fish (salmon, catfish and mackerel) Vitamin E Vegetable oil, wheat germ, nuts, spinach and fortified cereal Folic Acid Oranges, orange juice, strawberries, leafy vegetables, spinach, beets, broccoli, cauliflower, peas, pasta, beans, nuts and sunflower seeds Iron Red  meat and poultry, legumes, vegetables, some grains and fortified cereals Niacin (Vitamin B3) Eggs, meats, fish, peanuts, whole grains, bread products, fortified cereals and milk Protein Beans, poultry, red meat, fish, shellfish, eggs, milk, cheese, tofu, yogurt, fortified cereal and protein bars Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) Whole grains, dairy products, red meat, pork, poultry, fish, fortified cereals and eggs Thiamin  (Vitamin  B1) Zinc Whole  grains,  pork,  fortified  cereals,  wheat germ  and  eggs Red meats,  poultry,  beans,  nuts,  grains,  oysters, dairy  products  and  fortified  cereals How  Much  is Too  Much? Now that  you  know  what  you  should  be  eating,  how  do  you  go  about  figuring  out  how much  you  should  be  eating?  The  gold  standard  would  be  to  walk  around  reading  little  nutrition labels  and  keeping  a  small,  ongoing  food  journal  in  your  pocket  so  that  you  can  keep  track  of how  much  of  each  nutrient  you‟ve  taken  in  on  a  daily  basis-but  let‟s  wake  up  and  live  in  reality. No  one  has  that  much  time  on  their  hands.  Because  you  can‟t  always  keep  track  of  exactly  where you‟re  at  with  your  daily  requirements  you‟re  going  to  have  to  learn  to  make  some  sweeping generalizations. The  easiest  way  to  do  precisely  that  is  to  estimate  how  much  of  each  food  group  you  are going  to  need  on  a  daily  basis,  then  pick  foods  from  each  group  that  you‟re  particularly  fond  of and  that  provide  you  with  a  wide  variety  of  nutrients.  An  example  of  a  food  group  chart  is  shown below: Carbohydrates   Fruits-3  servings  daily   Vegetables-4  servings  daily   Whole grain  foods-9  servings  daily Meat   Poultry,  fish,  meat  or  legumes-3  servings  daily   Milk,  yogurt  or  cheese-3  to  4  servings  daily Does  that  sound  like  more  than  you  could  eat  in  a  week,  much  less  a  day?  Don‟t  worry.  A serving  in  this  context  isn‟t  the  half  a  plate  that  your  mother  used  to  give  you.  A  ham  sandwich made  with  whole  grain  bread  will  give  you  two  servings  of  whole  grains  and  one  serving  of meat.  Add  an  apple  to  that  and  you‟ve  just  had  one  of  your  fruit  servings  as  well.  A  typical serving  of  meat  is  considered  to  be  four  to  six  ounces,  about  the  size  of  a  chicken  breast  that  you would  find  in  a  formal  dining  establishment.  An  eight  ounce  glass  of  milk  will  give  you  a  serving of  dairy.   A day‟s  menu  to  meet  all  of  your  nutritional  requirements  might  look  something  like  this: Breakfast

2  cups  of  fortified  cereal  with  milk  (protein,  dairy  and  whole  grains) Banana Glass  of  orange  juice Snack Whole  wheat  English  muffin Apple Glass  of  milk Lunch Ham sandwich  made  with  whole  grain  bread 6  oz  baby  carrots Glass  of  milk Snack Glass  of  tomato  juice Whole  grain  bagel  with  organic  cream  cheese Broccoli  florets  dipped  in  Ranch  dressing Supper Trout  fillet  with  lemon Baked  potato 6  oz  peas Whole  grain  roll Glass  of  milk Snack Hot  chocolate 2  slices  of  whole  wheat  toast  with  calcium  fortified  butter

Mommy’s No-No List Just  as  there  are  certain  foods  that  you  should  be  sure  to  stock  up  on,  so  too  are  there foods  that  you  should  avoid  as  though  they  would  give  you  the  plague  if  you  were  to  breathe  in their  general  area  if  you  were  pregnant.  Of  course,  this  list  changes  from  year  to  year  so  take most  of  these  recommendations  with  a  grain  of  salt!   If  you‟re  unsure  whether  a  food  is  safe  for  you  to  eat,  or  if  you  have  heard  mixed  reports  or have  a  concern  based  on  your  individual  circumstances,  consult  your  OB/GYN.  Since  they  are regularly  required  to  take  continuing  education  classes  and  receive  frequent  updates  from  the research  fields  they  would  be  the  most  qualified  to  provide  you  with  information  pertaining specifically  to  your  pregnancy. Alcohol  is  first  on  the  list  of  No-No‟s  for  Mommies  to  Be,  and  with  good  reason.  The amount  of  alcohol  that  is  safe  to  consume  in  a  day  while  pregnant  has  yet  to  be  determined,  and the  incidence  of  known  cases  of  birth  defects  due  to  alcohol  consumption  is  on  the  rise. According  to  the  March  of  Dimes  “alcohol  is  the  most  common  known  cause  of  damage  to developing  babies  in  the  United  States  and  is  the  leading  cause  of  preventable  mental retardation.”   On a  more  personal  note,  alcohol  can  also  aggravate  many  of  the  common  side  effects  of pregnancy  such  as  nausea  and  heartburn.  It  also  takes  up  space  in  your  stomach  that  could  be filled  with  more  healthy  things,  like  water  or  juice.  If  you  can  forsake  alcohol  completely  during your  pregnancy,  that  would  be  the  best  choice  for  you  and  your  baby.  Does  that  mean  that  a  sip of  your  glass  when  you  toast  your  cousin‟s  wedding  is  going  to  leave  your  baby  scarred  for  life? No,  probably  not.  Use  your  good  sense.  While  a  sip  or  two  of  wine  every  now  and  then  probably won‟t  hurt  your  growing  angel,  a  shot  or  two  of  tequila  might  not  be  as  forgiving.  Pregnancy  is only  nine  months  long.  Your  baby  lasts  a  lifetime. The  other  scare  when  it  comes  to  pregnancy  eating  has  come  from  an  unexpected  sourcefish.  Long  lauded  as  the  best  source  of  protein  for  pregnant  women,  it  was  recently  discovered that  fish  was  also  high  in  mercury,  a  condition  caused  by  the  dumping  of  waste  into  the  water. Mercury  can  cause  irreparable  damage  to  a  fetus‟s  developing  nervous  system.  The  debate  as  to whether  specific  fish  can  be  considered  safe  or  not  is  still  ongoing,  but  pregnant  women  are currently  being  encouraged  to  avoid  shark,  swordfish,  king  mackerel,  tilefish,  bluefish,  tuna steak,  striped  bass,  freshwater  fish  and  canned  tuna. While  highly  processed  foods  may  not  cause  permanent  damage  to  your  unborn  baby they  usually  contain  enough  preservatives  to  qualify  them  as  highly  suspicious.  Remember, anything  that  claims  to  be  sugar  free  yet  tastes  sweet  has  some  form  of  sugar  substitute  in  it.  The question  is,  what  are  they  substituting?  Labels  such  as  “fat  free”  and  “caffeine  free”  should  also be  approached  with  caution.  Take  the  high  road  here  and  attempt  to  buy  whole,  natural  foods  as often  as  possible.  Look  at  the  list  of  ingredients  on  the  label.  The  longer  it  is,  the  less  likely  it  is to  be  healthy  for  your  baby If  you  have  a  hard  time  getting  started  in  the  morning  without  your  cup  of  Joe,  now‟s  going to  be  the  time  to  learn.  Caffeine  impedes  iron  absorption,  contributing  to  anemia  in  pregnant women  who  don‟t  have  enough  to  spare,  robs  the  body  of  precious  calcium  and  aggravates heartburn  all  in  one  fell  swoop.  It  also  transfers  to  your  baby  through  your  breastmilk,  which means  that  if  you  like  to  drink  coffee  and  you‟re  planning  on  breastfeeding  you  can  expect  a  lot of  late  nights.   Although  you  could  switch  to  decaf,  for  the  dedicated  coffee  drinker  this  is  about  the equivalent  of  taking  a  perfectly  good  cup  of  coffee  and  filling  it  2/3  full  of  water.  As  a  placebo it‟s  a  poor  substitute.  Instead,  try  a  cup  of  hot  chocolate  or  apple  cider  in  the  morning.  (Heating apple  juice  and  adding  a  little  cinnamon  works  too.)  The  hot  beverage  will  hit  a  few  of  the  “wake up”  buttons  that  coffee  triggers,  and  while  you‟ll  probably  feel  the  lack  of  caffeine  for  the  first week  or  two  you  should  find  that  getting  through  the  day  gets  easier-and  hey,  pregnant  women are  supposed  to  nap  regularly  anyway! Unpasteurized  cheeses,  soft  or  fresh  cheeses  such  as  Brie,  deli  meats,  hot  dogs, undercooked  eggs,  fish,  rare  to  medium  well  meats  and  unpasteurized  juices  are  also  being  added at  various  intervals  to  the  “no-no”  list  that  OB/GYNs  are  handing  out  to  their  patients  in  an attempt  to  stop  the  spread  of  pathogens  such  as  E.coli,  Salmonella  and  Listeria,  all  of  which  are often  present  in  undercooked  or  uncooked  meats.   Listeria,  the  leading  cause  of  meningitis  in  children  less  than  one  year  old,  has  the  ability to  cross  the  placenta  and  infect  the  baby.  It  can  also  cause  miscarriage.  Salmonella  has  been associated  with  stillbirth.  Even  if  fetal  death  doesn‟t  occur,  dehydration  from  the  diarrhea  and vomiting  that  accompany  Salmonella  infection  is  a  serious  risk.  A  severe  infection  with  E.  coli can  cause  dehydration  as  well  as  potentially  triggering  premature  labor  or  miscarriage. By the  same  token,  it  is  vitally  important  that  you  wash  your  fruits  and  vegetables thoroughly  before  you  eat  them,  particularly  if  you  grow  your  own.  You  were  probably  told  by your  physician  that  while  you  were  pregnant  you  shouldn‟t  handle  kitty  litter  due  to  a  potential infection  with  Toxoplasma,  a  parasite  that  lives  in  cat  feces.  Toxoplasma  is  also  present  in  the soil,  particularly  in  areas  where  cats  often  roam  and  do  their  business  outside.  There  is  always  a risk  of  Toxoplasma  appearing  in  commercially  processed  foods,  although  it  is  less  common  than in  home  grown.   It  is  better  to  be  safe  than  sorry  when  dealing  with  Toxoplasma.  The  parasite  can  cross the  placenta,  infecting  the  baby  and  causing  stillbirth  or  long  term  damage.  There  is  a  15% chance  of  the  parasite  infecting  the  baby  if  exposure  occurs  in  the  first  trimester,  30%  in  the second  and  60%  in  the  third.   Pathogenic  infection  of  the  developing  fetus  can  be  potentially  devastating,  particularly  when it  is  caused  by  an  invader  that  an  adult  immune  system  would  be  able  to  battle  off  with  ease.  It  is far  better  to  take  the  time  to  carefully  ensure  that  your  food  is  pathogen  free  during  pregnancy than  to  have  to  live  with  the  consequences.

What  if  You  Can’t  Eat  a  Regular  Diet? As  children  are  exposed  to  more  foods  at  an  earlier  age  the  incidence  of  food  allergy  and intolerance  is  rising.  Add  to  this  the  problems  of  diabetes,  vegan  and  vegetarianism,  metabolic disorders  and  general  dislikes  and  you  can  come  up  with  an  equation  that  equals  trouble  for  a pregnant  woman.  The  question  is,  what  do  you  do  when  you  can‟t  eat  a  regular  pregnancy  diet? The  answer  is,  get  creative!  If  you  suffer  from  diabetes  or  a  digestive  disorder,  or  you have  a  major  metabolic  disorder  such  as  PKU  or  tyrosinemia  (and  these  are  only  a  few  from  a very  long  list  that  are  usually  diagnosed  during  early  childhood)  you  probably  have  a  pretty  good idea  of  how  to  manage  your  diet  to  provide  the  most  nutrients  at  a  time  without  overdoing  it.  To be  safe,  however,  it  would  be  wise  to  speak  with  your  doctor  about  what  foods  you  can  and cannot  have  (and  in  what  amounts  you  are  allowed  to  have  them)  in  the  coming  months.   If  you  do  not  have  a  condition  that  requires  specific,  direct  medical  supervision  and simply  need  to  make  some  changes  to  the  diet  shown  earlier  you‟re  going  to  find  that  it‟s  going to  be  much  simpler  than  you  would  think  (although  you‟re  probably  going  to  be  pretty  sick  of your  core  foods  by  the  time  you  deliver!)  With  some  dietary  substitutions,  however,  you  should still  be  able  to  maintain  a  healthy  diet  throughout  the  course  of  your  pregnancy. Food  Allergies  and  Intolerance Food  allergies,  particularly  those  to  milk,  soy,  nuts  and  wheat,  can  be  a  major  issue  when it  comes  to  maintaining  a  proper  diet.  It‟s  very  hard  to  get  enough  calcium  when  you  can‟t  drink a  single  glass  of  milk  or  eat  a  milk  product!  The  key  here  is  to  talk  to  your  doctor  about recommending  some  healthy  substitutions.  There  are  some,  such  as  a  milk  allergy  or  a  peanut allergy,  that  are  easy  to  work  around  with  calcium  fortified  juices  and  chewable  supplements  and other  sources  of  protein.   If  you  have  either  one  of  these  allergies  you  should  be  very  careful  to  keep  your  food essentially  isolated,  something  which  you  are  undoubtedly  already  aware  of.  Many  smoothies and  “Meals  in  a  Box”  contain  these  ingredients  in  some  quantity  or  another.  The  severity  of  your allergy  should  be  considered  when  you‟re  choosing  your  foods,  but  if  you  suffer  from anaphylaxis  you  are  going  to  want  to  stay  clear  of  them  altogether.  Choose  plain  meats  and  fresh fruits  and  vegetables  over  stews  and  casseroles,  and  try  to  avoid  gravies  if  you  can‟t  see  the  list of  ingredients. Occasionally  allergic  reactions  will  be  more  intense  in  pregnancy,  so  if  you  had  a  mild reaction  to  certain  foods  before  you  were  pregnant  you  should  handle  them  with  care  now. Remember,  pregnancy  is  only  nine  months  long.  Your  body  should  go  back  to  normal  when  it‟s all  said  and  done  and  you  can  go  back  to  your  favorite  foods  and  drinks  then.  Until  then,  it  never hurts  to  err  on  the  side  of  paranoia.

If  you  have  an  allergy  to  wheat  or  soy  you  may  have  a  bit  more  trouble,  since  many  of  the foods  you  are  going  to  need  to  eat  to  get  your  servings  of  carbohydrates  are  going  to  contain these  ingredients.  (Unless  you  actually  have  a  soy  allergy  you  are  probably  unaware  of  how  often it‟s  mixed  in  with  many  foods.)    You  are  going  to  have  to  carefully  read  the  labels  on  the  foods you  eat,  checking  for  any  of  the  following  words:   Soy   Soy flour   Soy cheese   Soy protein   Textured  soy  protein   Textured  vegetable  protein   Tofu   Vegetable  protein   Yuba   Edamame   Tempeh   Mono-diglyceride   Natto   Okara   Soya,  soja,  soybean,  soyabeans   Wheat   Bulgur   Couscous   Enriched/white/whole  wheat  flour   Farina   Gluten   Graham  flour   Kamut   Semolina   Triticale   Wheat bran/germ You‟ll  find  these  included  in  many  bread  products,  so  it  would  be  prudent  to  get  your carbohydrates  from  other  sources.  The  list  of  nutrient  sources  provides  you  with  some  acceptable alternatives,  so  don‟t  feel  that  you  have  to  eat  a  particular  food  just  because  it‟s  on  your  list.  If you  have  preexisting  health  conditions  they  must  be  considered  first.  Many  women  with  a  mild milk  allergy  or  wheat  allergy  will  deliberately  deal  with  the  side  effects  in  the  interest  of providing  their  babies  with  vital  nutrients.  Pregnancy  is  uncomfortable  enough  without  adding  to it  by  making  yourself  sick! If  you  are  unsure  about  which  foods  can  be  substituted  in  your  diet  without  causing  you to  lose  nutritional  value  make  an  appointment  to  speak  with  the  nutritionist  at  your  physician‟s office  or  local  health  department.  They  are  specially  trained  to  help  people  with  dietary

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *